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Noticeboard

Please note that from 3rd April 2018, we are delighted to inform our patients at Wellside Medical Centre and Charnwood Surgery that we will start working jointly together with a view that from April 2019 we will be fully merging to create one organisation and this will mean some changes.  Please see more information in the newsletter and in the surgeries.

PATIENT QUESTIONS

 Opening Times Update

Updated information January 2018 - Change of Address- if you change your address we will need this in writing or in person and will ask that you bring written proof to the surgery, which has a date within the last 28 days for example a utility bill ( not mobile phone). 

NHS Online

This practice currently offers the facility for patients

  • To book, view, amend, cancel and print appointments online
  • To order online, view and print a list of their repeat prescription for drugs, medicines or appliances
  • To view online, export or print summary information from their record, relating to medications, allergies and adverse reactions

This is via TPP SystmOne using our website www.wellsidemedicalcentre.co.uk

If you do not already have a username and password for this system you will need to register by calling in to the practice in person with appropriate identification. Please enquire at reception beforehand as to the nature of identification that will be appropriate for this purpose.

 

We will seek necessary assurances from our clinical software providers to ensure that patients can request online access to their detailed coded records in a manner that is secure and safeguards the best interests of the patient.

We will inform patients when appropriate arrangements are in place and we will publicise and promote our online services using the practice website and waiting room posters.

Thank you

PERTUSSIS IMMUNISATION CAMPAIGN FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

The Department of Health have recommended that pregnant women have the whooping cough vaccine from 28 weeks of pregnancy. Please contact the surgery to arrange an appointment with the Practice Nurse.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening - 65+ Men

This year, men aged 65 will be sent an NHS screening invitation. Those aged over 66+ years can request a scan if they have not been screened before. For more information visit aaa.screening.nhs.uk or speak with your GP who will have a supply of the appropriate self referral form.

Dates For Your Diary

The surgery will be CLOSED from 12pm for staff training on the following dates:

Wednesday 2nd May 2018

Wednesday 16th May 2018

Wednesday 30th May 2018

Wednesday 13th June 2018

Wednesday 4th July 2018

Wednesday 19th September 2018

Not Sure What To Do When Your Child Is ill

Urine Samples

Please note we do not accept  samples at the surgery unless the Doctor has specifically requested you to bring one to the surgery.

Useful Information for Patients

What happens when you are referred by your GP to see a specialist?

Why have I been referred?

Your GP will discuss with you and, if appropriate, your carer, about why a referral is being recommended. It is usually because your GP wants a specialist’s help in deciding on the best way to treat your condition. This might involve referring you for tests or investigations that cannot be carried out in a GP surgery. Your GP will also discuss with you what choices there are for where you can be referred.

How will I hear about where and when the appointment is?

GP practices and hospitals use different ways of arranging appointments:

• Your GP practice may give you a reference number and a password you can use to book, change or cancel your appointment online or by phone. In time, more and more GP practices will refer patients in this way.

• You may receive a letter from the hospital confirming your appointment. You need to reply as soon as possible and tell the hospital if you can attend on the date offered.

• Alternatively, sometimes patients receive a letter asking them to phone the hospital to make an appointment with a specialist.

 

Seeing the specialist:

What happens if I need a test or procedure?

Normally, if the specialist thinks you need any test, investigation or surgical procedure, the specialist is responsible for:

• arranging the test, investigation or procedure, explaining how and when you will receive a date and what to do if the date is not suitable for you; and

• giving you the results and explaining what they mean (this may be done in a separate appointment with the specialist or by letter).

What happens if I need new medicines?

The specialist might suggest prescribing new medicines for you or might want to make changes to the medicines that you are already taking.

The specialist is responsible for:

• giving you the first prescription for any new medicine that you need to start taking straightaway; and

• giving you enough medicine to last at least the first seven days, unless you need to take the medicine for a shorter time. After this, you will need to contact your GP surgery if another prescription is required.

It is important that you understand whether you need to start any new medicines, or whether the specialist has changed the medicines you already take, so ask the specialist if you are not sure. In some cases, your GP will not be able to prescribe certain medicines and you will need to continue to receive these from the hospital. You will be told about this at your appointment.

 

What if I need a Fit Note(previously known as Sick Note)?

If you need to be certified as unfit for work following treatment by a specialist:

• The specialist should issue you with a Fit Note.

• The Fit Note should cover the period they expect you to be unfit to work, or until your next contact with the specialist.

You should not need to see your GP to get a Fit Note following hospital treatment, unless your inability to work is unexpectedly prolonged.

What if I need a follow up appointment?

The specialist will discuss with you whether you should attend hospital for ongoing follow-up care or whether you should be discharged back to your GP. If the specialist thinks you do need to be seen again, the hospital will give you another appointment or tell you when to expect this. If you do not hear anything, please contact the specialist’s office, rather than your GP surgery.

What do I do if I have any questions?

• If you have any specific questions related to your hospital care, your specialist will be able to help you with this, so it is important that you make sure you know how you can contact your specialist’s office.

• If you have any general questions related to your health, your GP surgery will be able to help you.

When seeing a specialist: your checklist

c If I need to start taking a new medicine straightaway, has the hospital provided me with a supply to last at least seven days (or less, if I need to take the medicine for a shorter period)?

c Do I understand what the medication is for, how to take it and any side effects?

c If appropriate, has a Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) been supplied?

c Do I have the contact details for the specialist’s office if I have a question?

c If I need a Fit Note, has the hospital provided me with one, and does it cover the length of time the specialist expects me to be off work?

c Do I need a hospital follow up appointment and if so, do I know how this is organised?

c If appropriate, do I have the names and contact details of organisations who can give me more information or support if I need it?

If you are unsure about any of the questions in the checklist, please make sure you discuss them with a member of staff before you leave hospital.

Access an electronic copy of this leaflet:www.england.nhs.uk/patientinterface/

This information can be made available in alternative formats, such as easy read or large print, and may be available in alternative languages, upon request. Please contact 0300 311 22 33 or email: england.contactus@nhs.net.

EnglandFirst published: October 2017

What happens when you are referred by your GP to see a specialist?

This leaflet describes what you can expect to happen when your GP refers you to see a specialist or consultant, at a hospital or a community health centre.

This leaflet has been developed with the help and support of NHS England, the British Medical Association and the National Association for Patient Participation:



 
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